Eye Safety During a Solar Eclipse

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon blocks any part of the sun. On Monday, August 21, a solar eclipse will be visible (weather permitting) along a narrow band across all of North America. The whole continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through the event, anyone within the roughly 70-mile-wide path of “totality” will experience a brief total eclipse, when the moon completely blocks the sun’s bright face for just under two minutes, turning day into night and making visible the otherwise hidden solar corona — the sun’s outer atmosphere — one of nature’s most awesome sights. Bright stars and planets will become visible as well.

Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.  Marion County and Salem are in this path.  Continue reading